Madness

People often use the word ‘mad’ or ‘crazy’ to denigrate an individual. This is most often done in defence of the status quo. You are often considered mad simply if you are abnormal. A mad person may be someone who threatens the comfort zone of others. Someone who makes the majority question a facet of […]

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The Fourth Industrial Revolution

“We need a shift to a new system that will allow us to meet the basic needs of every human on the planet, that will live within planetary means, that will be fairer, and that will be focused as its key goal not on growth per se, but on maximising human well-being. History tells us […]

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Utopia

The word ‘utopia’ traces its origins to the title of a book written by Thomas More in 1515. At the time, a new elite was amassing wealth by enclosing common lands and Utopia was written as a damning critique. It attacked the practice of hanging thieves and denounced the king for ruling over a nation of […]

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The Era of the Empath

Poppy Crum’s talk from April of this year discusses in 12 short minutes the possibilities inherent in a technology that can read and understand our ‘chemical signatures’; our biological tells. It is rare in life for humans to fully or efficiently convey their feelings and emotions to one another. Often because they may not understand […]

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Wealth Inequality

“Today’s high levels of wealth inequality are not inevitable, they are a political choice”  – The Independent  In 2017 more than 70 percent of the world’s adults own under $10,000 in wealth. This 70.1 percent of the world holds only 3 percent of global wealth. The world’s wealthiest individuals, those owning over $100,000 in assets, […]

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Discriminating by Geography

‘It [Brexit] was a vote to restore, as we see it, our parliamentary democracy, national self-determination, and to become even more global and internationalist in action and in spirit’ Theresa May – 17th January 2017 The decision of the British public on the 23rd of June 2016 to withdraw from the European Union brought the […]

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The Wealth of Nations [Theory]

In 1776 Scot Adam Smith composed what is perhaps the most famous economics manifesto ever created, The Wealth of Nations. In the eighth chapter of the first volume Smith outlines his belief that when a business owner makes more money than she/he requires, they will logically reinvest this money into their productive assets (capital), in […]

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The little things

Today I had an encounter with Boris. I was sitting in the library attempting to work when Boris charged in – made a load of noise – and left again. He was in the worst of moods. As I would be if I’d left the wide open world to sit in a dusty European studies […]

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The Security Dilemma

The two most famous strands of international relations theory – realism and liberalism – dictate that the international system is characterised by ‘anarchy’. In 1951 John Herz published a book entitled Political Realism and Political Idealism in which he coined the famous term ‘The Security Dilemma’. “A structural notion in which the self-help attempts of states […]

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The Tyranny of Convenience

“We must never forget the joy of doing something slow and something difficult, the satisfaction of not doing what is easiest. The constellation of inconvenient choices may be all that stands between us and a life of total, efficient conformity” – The New York Times It seems now more than ever that the right choice […]

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