AI and the Unanswered Questions

1) What happens when machines pass the Turing Test, or further still, the point of Singularity?
2) How do we ensure the compliance of a machine that we don’t understand?
3) Can we realistically ensure the long-term survival of humanity in the age of super-intelligent AI?
4) If we can, how should human society, politics and economics be structured?
5) Does such a machine render both organic and inorganic human inequalities comparatively obsolete?
Here are some of my favourite must-see talks on this topic, which help to answer these questions:

“Scared of superintelligent AI? You should be, says neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris — and not just in some theoretical way. We’re going to build superhuman machines, says Harris, but we haven’t yet grappled with the problems associated with creating something that may treat us the way we treat ants” – TED

Artificial intelligence is getting smarter by leaps and bounds — within this century, research suggests, a computer AI could be as “smart” as a human being. And then, says Nick Bostrom, it will overtake us: “Machine intelligence is the last invention that humanity will ever need to make.” A philosopher and technologist, Bostrom asks us to think hard about the world we’re building right now, driven by thinking machines. Will our smart machines help to preserve humanity and our values — or will they have values of their own? – TED

As a research scientist at Google, Margaret Mitchell helps develop computers that can communicate about what they see and understand. She tells a cautionary tale about the gaps, blind spots and biases we subconsciously encode into AI — and asks us to consider what the technology we create today will mean for tomorrow. “All that we see now is a snapshot in the evolution of artificial intelligence,” Mitchell says. “If we want AI to evolve in a way that helps humans, then we need to define the goals and strategies that enable that path now.” – TED

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